‘tweet cred’

 

‘tweet cred’

Although our company is fairly new to social marketing and, specifically, Twitter (our twitter age is 332 days 3 hours 43 minutes 47 seconds (according to TwitterTime) at the time this blog is being written), I have been able to pick up on a few things using my super-researcher power of observation.  I’ve learned mainly that, to get anywhere in this twitterverse, you have to have that special something that makes tweeple want to share with others what you share them, to forward on your informative and thought-provoking article links, to admit they hold you in esteem enough to re-tweet you and put their name with yours.

 

You have to have ‘tweet cred’.

 

I coined the term ‘tweet cred’ (I’m pretty sure no one else has yet) because, hey, who doesn’t want to create a fun, catchy twitter-phrase?  But also because I’ve noticed that on twitter, like elsewhere in life, unless you develop a certain level of ‘street cred’ (credibility or special notoriety), you can and will be left behind.  Your lack of prominence can cause your views, thoughts, opinions, and information to be ignored in the virtual world just as easily as it can be ignored in the real world. In fact, it’s probably much easier.

 

So how can you build yourself some ‘tweet cred’?  While again, we and I are no experts at the social media game – we are but humble market researchers after all – I have picked up a few things during my short lifetime on twitter thus far and am glad to share them with you. 

 

Of course, if you think I have no tweet cred, feel free to disregard the below.  :)


  1. Pay it forward – if you want others to re-tweet you, then re-tweet them. Plain and simple
  2. Share useful stuff – the twitterverse is not only for you to pollute with your own self-aggrandizing, hard-core sales efforts; it’s for sharing info that could assist, educate, amuse, and evolve others.
  3. Interact – Respond to what others share and engage them in 140 character conversations.  Trust me, it’s appreciated and others will return the favor.
  4. Mind your manners – “Please” and “thank you” are as important online as they are offline. If tweeps help you out or re-tweet your posts, then show them appreciation for it.  Proper decorum always builds credibility and displays strength of character.
  5. Don’t be a sticky fingers – if you are re-tweeting something someone else posted make sure to give credit where credit is due. Plagiarism is never cool and is ruinous to one’s tweet cred.
  6. Stay current – if a tweep posts a blog on their website, and there’s no tweet about it to share, does it really get posted at all? Think about it.
  7. Finally, don’t be afraid to make the first move – Twitter is becoming the great equalizer of people and brands – everyone is accessible to everyone as long as a profile exists.  Go ahead and follow people even if they are not yet following you.  Maybe they won’t ever follow you – that’s okay, too.  By reaching out and making new connections you are displaying confidence in yourself, your organization, and the information you choose to share.

 

We are continuing to build our tweet cred everyday and are working to experience the number of re-tweets that we see others enjoy.  Like all aspects of business, it takes diligence, time, commitment, and integrity.  And if you go about it the right way, there just might be a hashtag with your name on it one day. 

 

Happy tweeting!

 

-- Michelle Finzel
VP, Full Service Research & Social Media Manager
@MDMktingSource

 

 

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